Q: What is ISF?

A: On November 25, 2008, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published an interim final rule entitled “Importer Security Filing and Additional Carrier Requirements” in the Federal Register (73 FR 71730). The interim final rule requires both importers and carriers to submit additional information pertaining to cargo to CBP before the cargo is brought into the United States by vessel.

 

 

Q: Who is responsible for the ISF Filing?

A: The “Importer of Record”, either is the owner or the purchaser or the consignee of the goods.

 

 

Q: Pursuant to the new regulations, some ISF elements must be submitted no later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard the vessel at the foreign port. When cargo is first laden aboard a feeder vessel, are these elements required no later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard the feeder vessel OR the vessel destined to the United States? 

A: For ISF elements that must be submitted no later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard the vessel at the foreign port, the elements must be submitted no later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard a vessel destined to the United States

 

 

Q: Who can file ISF?

A: The importer or any properly designated agent. An ISF Filer must have a software system validated by US Customs.

 

 

Q: Where does the data come from?

A: The required data needs to be obtained from the shipper. If Horizon Star is handling your fregiht, we will get the data for you directly from our overseas office.

 

 

Q: What are the 10 Data Fields provided by the shipper and the 2 provided by the ocean carrier?

A: Seller name and address, Buyer name and address, Importer of Record name and EIN, Consignee EIN Manufacturer name and address, Ship to Party name and address, Country of Origin, HTS# (to six digits), Container Stuffing Location, Consolidator's name and address

 

 

Q: Do I need to get the ISF filed for all my import shipments?

A: At this time, ISF is only required for ALL your Ocean Freight.

 

 

Q: In addition to our FOB and C&F Purchases, we have LDP, DDU and DDP shipments, then who is responsible for ISF?

A: The “Importer.” sometimes you may not be the “importer of record”, however CBP may choose to fine you if you “caused” the goods to enter the United States.

 

 

Q: What are the fines for non compliance?

A: $5000 per violation, up to $10,000 per bill of lading.

 

 

Q: Can I buy insurance against these fines?

A: Yes - please contact us for underwriting information.

 

 

Q: Does an Importer need an ISF bond?

A: Yes. If you already have an annual import bond on file with US Customs, your bond will already cover this. If you need a bond, no matter it's an annual or single bond Horizon Star can obtain one for you at a lower cost.

 

 

Q: Can the data be shared with our ERP?

A: Yes, Horizon Star can transmit the data via EDI or XML

 

 

Q: How can we confirm our ISF Filings have been done?

A: Upon request, Horizon Star will send you the receipt showing ISF accepted by the US Customs

 

 

Q: What’s the difference between 10+2 and ISF?

A: The official name of the program is Importer Security Filing (ISF), which contains 10 data fields provided by the Shipper & Importer and 2 data fields provided by the carrier. ISF and 10+2 are Synonymous.

 

 

Q: Is ISF the same as AMS?

A: No, AMS is a separate filing with the data going to a separate targeting office of US Customs, AMS is the carriers responsibility while ISF is the Importers responsibility.